Dr. Harvey Simon – Healthy Men

The Harvard Medical School Guide to Men’s Health

Dr. Harvey B. Simon is the author of “The Harvard Medical School Guide to Men’s Health” and the founding editor of the Harvard Men’s Health Watch newsletter. His book discusses a multitude of health issues that are unique to men and some are common to women as well.

Dr. Harvey Simon recommends “An Equal Music,” by Vikram Seth.

Originally Broadcast: December 31, 2002

Click here to begin listenings.

Thomas Hine – Compulsive Shoppers

I Want That! How We All Became Shoppers: A Cultural History

“I Want That! How We All Became Shoppers: A Cultural History” is the title of a new book by Thomas Hine. In this book he discusses why we want objects and how they change us. He looks at early forms of trading, and proceeds through the history of materialism.

Thomas Hine recommends “Refinement of America,” by Richard Bushman.

Originally Broadcast: December 17, 2002

Click here to begin listening.

Edmisten, Patricia – Peace Corps, Peru, 1962-1964

The Mourning of Angles

The life of Lydia Schaefer is a composite fictional story of a 22 year-old woman who served in the Peace Corps in Peru from 1962 to 1964. Patricia Taylor Edmisten, a former Peace Corps Volunteer from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, tells Lydia’s story in her book, “The Mourning of Angles,” based in part on her experiences in the Peace Corps in Peru during those years.

Patricia Edmisten recommends “The Accidental Pope,” by Raymond Flynn & Robin Moore.

Originally Broadcast: November 15, 2002

Click here to begin listening.

Dr. Frank Vertosick – Evolutionary Intelligence

The Genius Within: Discovering the Intelligence of Every Living Thing

Neurosurgeon Dr. Frank Vertosick is the author of “The Genius Within, Discovering the Intelligence of Every Living Thing,” a book that discusses learning among all species. He talks about learning through evolution or alteration of the genetic structure as compared to learning the way we more commonly think of it, by studying or by experience.

Dr. Frank Vertosick recommends “Linked: The New Science of Networks,” by Albert Lazlso-Barbasi.

Originally Broadcast: October 9, 2002

Click here to begin listening.

Lerner, Dr. Gerda – The Foremother of Women’s History

Fireweed: A Political Autobiography

The history of women has existed as long as humans have, but it was not until the last half of the 20th Century that women’s history received academic attention. Our guest, Professor Gerda Lerner is a pioneer of the study of women’s history and a founder of the movement to study and record the history of women.

Gerda Lerner led an extraordinary life from April 30, 1920 to January 2, 2013.  She was a historian, author and teacher, and ultimately a professor emeritus of history at the University of Wisconsin.  Her academic work was characterized by the attention she drew to the differences among women in class, race and sexual orientation.

She grew up in Vienna, Austria, suffered in the Nazi persecution of the European Jews, came to the United States as a teenager, and married a writer who was subsequently blacklisted in the 1950s.  She later entered Columbia University in 1958, originally to take a few classes and by 1966 she had earned a doctorate in history.

“Fireweed: A Political Autobiography,”  tells her life story up to the time she enrolled at Columbia University.

Professor Lerner and I visited by phone in October 2002, began with her description why the distinctions among women of class, race and sexual orientation are important.

The book Dr. Gerda Lerner recommends is “A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812″ by Laurel Ulrich.

Originally Broadcast: October 1, 2002

Click here to listen or on the media player below.

Click here to download the podcast.

McConnell, Patricia – Act Like a Dog, Your Dog Will Obey

The Other End of the Leash: Why We Do What We Do Around Dogs

“The Other End of the Leash—Why We Do What We Do Around Dogs”, is a recent book by Patricia McConnell, a certified applied animal behaviorist affiliated with the University of Wisconsin. In her book, she discusses how to think from a dog’s perspective, how to get your dog to come when called by acting less like a primate and more like a dog, and how dogs and humans share personality types.

Patricia McConnell recommends “The Ape and Shusi Master,” by Franz DeWaal.

Originally Broadcast: September 17, 2002

Click here to begin listening.

Douglas Starr – Blood: A History

Blood, an Epic History of Medicine and Commerce

Human blood has been compared historically and sociologically to a river that defines human society over the millennia. That river has been charted in a recent book and television series entitled, “Blood, an Epic History of Medicine and Commerce,” by Douglas Starr. This work traces the history of blood in medical, political and economic terms, from the earliest days of bloodletting to the era of AIDS.

Douglas Starr recommends “Instance of the Finger Post,” by Ian Beers.

Originally Broadcast: September 14, 2002

Click here to begin listening.

Eric Schlosser – Do You Really Want to Eat That?

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal

Eric Schlosser, the author of “Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal,” writes that it is not only what is served for human consumption that plagues the country, but the art of mass marketing to children – through organized promotions and ads in school buses, hallways and even bathroom stalls – that has serious side effects in society.

Eric Schlosser recommends “New Jack,” by Ted Conover.

Originally Broadcast: August 1, 2002

Click here to begin listening.

Peter Hessler – A Peace Corps Volunteer in China

River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze

Imagine arriving by boat in a rural town of 150,000 people where two rivers join in central China. Imagine being one of the first two Americans to live there in 50 years, and speaking very little Chinese. That is experience of Peter Hessler, the author of “River Town.”

Peter Hessler recommends “This Boy’s Life,” by Tobias Wolf.

Originally Broadcast: August 1, 2002

Click here to begin listening.

Terrence Cheng – Two Chinese Brothers

Sons of Heaven

In June of 1989, in Tienamin Square, in the justify of Beijing, China, one of the largest student protests ever to occur in that country took place. The “Sons of Heaven,” by Terrence Cheng, is a novel about three major players in this drama, Deng Xiao Ping, the leader of China at the time, and two brothers, one a soldier in the Red Army in Teinamin Square at the time, and the other the man who stood in front of the tanks.

Terrence Cheng recommends “Ghost Written,” by David Mitchell.

Originally Broadcast: August 1, 2002

Click here to begin listening.